The Power of Capsulized Foods

For most people, the concept of capsulized food(TM) usually conjures up images of space travelers ingesting meals condensed into a compact pill. However, in modern-day reality, things are quite different. Capsulized foods are one of the most innovative nutritional advancements in recent memory, and will soon become a significant – and highly valued – concept within the healthy eating community.

To understand what capsulized foods are and how they are positively changing the way the world eats, it is helpful to see the problem that capsulized foods are designed to solve. In a word, that problem is: lack.

Despite the growing awareness of eating healthy, most attempts to provide people with healthy meal and nutritional products suffer from some kind of ‘lack’.

There is a lack of convenience. Many foods are not packaged for convenience. Those that are convenient are oftentimes heavily processed and filled with artificial ingredients. And, preparing meals often requires a luxury of time many consumers do not have.

There is a lack of portability. This is a direct extension of convenience. Though a full-course meal may provide the right amount of low glycemic carbohydrates, unsaturated fats, and complete proteins, it is often tethered to the kitchen table.

There is a lack of sources. Our world is abundant with natural and processed foods. Yet, finding the right combination of those foods to meet our dietary needs is challenging for many. The array of choices adds to the confusion, and sometimes the food selections we want are not available to us. Whether one is on a low carbohydrate, low fat, or isometric diet, finding the right foods and incorporating them into our daily lifestyle requires effort.

There is a lack of nutrient-density. This refers to the amount of nutrition within a given food. For example, a soft pretzel weighing 60 grams has a low density of nutrition, whereas an egg also weighing 60 grams has a high density of nutrition. Ounce for ounce, many processed foods possess less nutritional value (or, density) than whole foods such as fruits and vegetables. However, many processed foods have great merit since they do provide dense nutrition in a small amount of food. The challenge is in identifying the foods that are rich in nutrients versus the foods that are not.

It is within this situation of lack that capsulized foods provide real eating solutions. Sometimes called “compact liquid foods”, capsulized foods are extremely portable, require no preparation time at all, and travel easily due to their small, durable, and lightweight containers. At the same time, capsulized foods are liquefied, which allows them to be quickly consumed. This is of primary importance to eaters who simply do not have time to prepare and then sit through a traditional meal. Capsulized foods are also extremely rich in nutrients, and in fact provide the highest nutritional value per fluid ounce of any food product on the market. As such, capsulized foods effectively solve the lack of convenience, portability, and nutrition-density in a single, cost-effective eating solution.

Yet there is another key aspect of capsulized foods that must be present; in fact, it is arguably the most important aspect of all: taste[i].

Research has proven that nutritional supplements of any kind will simply not have a lasting impact if taste is not a primary design consideration. True, while people are willing to tolerate foul-tasting cough medicine, they only do so because the frequency is a few times per year. Eating, however, is an activity – and for many, an enjoyable activity – that people engage in on a daily basis; several times a day, in fact. Asking people to tolerate unpalatable nutritional foods is simply not a reasonable expectation, and for years, any attempt to create capsulized food has been unable to overcome this hurdle. That is, until very recently. Manufacturers today understand that in order to develop a capsulized food – a food that can become a staple in consumer diets — taste is paramount.

Capsulized foods often provide a complete macronutrient- and micronutrient-enriched meal in a only a few liquid ounces. This allows consumers to go from hungry to satiated, and from undernourished to nourished in less than five seconds. And at around 100 to 200 calories, capsulized foods are suitable for those on calorie-reduced diets, or those who simply want to maintain their weight.

The defining target market for nutritional supplements is no longer elite athletes, but the millions of everyday people who have been exposed, some since birth, to sugary cereals, fast foods, potato chips, candy bars, and caffeinated soft drinks[ii]. This broad group of consumers is interested in healthy choices, but has proven its absolute power in punishing products that fail to reach the lofty bar set by taste buds. They also demand convenience, and capsulized foods deliver.

Eaters can now, through capsulized foods, enjoy the convenience, portability, nutritional-density, and taste that they have demanded for decades. This bodes well for not only the current generation, but future generations as well, who will have access to capsulized foods as viable and intelligent eating options.

ABOUT PROTICA

Founded in 2001, Protica, Inc. is a nutritional research firm with offices in Lafayette Hill and Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. Protica manufactures capsulized foods, including Profect, a compact, hypoallergenic, ready-to-drink protein beverage containing zero carbohydrates and zero fat. Information on Protica is available at http://www.protica.com

You can also learn about Profect at http://www.profect.com

REFERENCES

[i] Source: “Taste Matters”. AFIC.
http://www.afic.org/Taste%20Matters.htm

[ii] Source: “Sports Drinks and Energy Bars: Fuelling the Couch Potato”. Kalorama Information.
http://www.kaloramainformation.com/editor/viewcontent.asp?prid=373

How to Relieve Back Pain Using an Inversion Table

Today, more people are purchasing inversion tables than ever before. The main reason for this is that this “hang upside down machine” enables spinal decompression thereby relieving back pain. Unfortunately, despite the increase in the number of people buying this particular machine, many people still don’t know what to do with it once they get home. Below is a beginner’s guide on how to relieve back pain using an inversion table.

Step 1
The first thing that you should do before you begin your lower back exercises is to adjust the height setting. To ensure that you leave enough space between your head and the floor, the height setting should be about 2 inches more than your actual height.

Step 2
Once you have adjusted the height setting, go ahead and adjust the tether strap. Remember, it is the tether strap that determines your angle of inversion. If you want to achieve a full, 90 degree, inversion, do away with the tether strap.

Step 3
While standing on the foot platform, put the ankle clamps around your ankles and adjust them until they feel secure enough.

Step 4
Raise your arms above your head one at a time and the inversion table will begin to tilt. That’s because many inversion tables are designed to respond to shifts in body weight distribution.

Step 5
Once your body is inverted, you can remain in that position for between two and seven minutes. During this time, you can perform any of the following back strengthening exercises.

Jackknife Stretch
To perform this simple stretch, just raise your arms so that they are below your head and remain in that position for 30 seconds. The purpose of this exercise is to increase blood flow to your back’s muscles.

Inverted Crunches
In order for your spine to maintain its natural shape, you need strong abdominal muscles. To perform an inverted crunch, cross your arms over your chest and slowly raise your upper body towards your legs until you are in a sitting position. Repeat this exercise as many times as you want.

Arches
To perform an arch, just grab the frame of the table and raise your stomach away from the table so that you back looks like an arch.

Step 6
To return to an upright position, slowly place your arms at your sides and bend your knees slightly.

Step 7
Loosen the ankle clamps and slide your ankles out.

Protect Your Data and the Environment Through Drive Recycling

I find myself sitting in the second floor of a huge public library in a good-sized college town. I came here for the quiet and solitude, for a change of scenery that was different from my home office. What I got was an overwhelming sense of how technology has changed our lives. Even though I am sitting amidst long, tall rows of books on every conceivable subject, I look around and see folks at tables, clicking away on laptops and netbooks.

This particular library has over sixty public computers scattered throughout its two-story repository. There is even a computer lab for patrons to use. In addition, I am connected to the virtual world outside through their free Internet WIFI connection. Do you remember the card catalog cabinets and the Dewey Decimal System? It’s all on computer now, thank goodness. You don’t get just a shelf location; you get a map!

As I gaze out the window to the street below, I see college students walking, or rather, dancing down the sidewalk with tiny headsets stuck in their ears, harnessed to a tiny mp3 player. I think back to my vinyl LP record collection that took up two shelves that were six feet long. There is more music stored on those tiny devices than I could ever fit in my house.

When I walked in the door to get my new library card, I was advised to put my cellphone on silent. I can remember back when our telephone was on a party line and we had to wait our turn to use the service. These days, the tether of the handset cord to the phone is gone; we have free rein to roam anywhere in the world and still be able to phone home.

Unfortunately, those technological advances that have enriched our lives have a downside: electronic waste. According to a recent Environmental Protection Agency study, our electronic waste is having a negative impact, not just locally, but globally. In the United States, the EPA estimates that 1% of our municipal waste streams are composed of electronic waste. They also estimate that 30 to 40 million computers will be scrapped each year for the next couple of years as they reach their end of usable service. Technology and software advances are making computers obsolete, almost before they are sold off the shelf.

Recycling old computer parts, such as hard drives, may not eliminate the problem, but it can surely help. Data loss that requires a hard disk file recovery service often means that the hard drive is toast. Physically damaged drives can be repaired enough to perform NTFS file recovery, but they are no longer reliable. The next time you need internal or external hard drive data recovery, look for a company that has a hard drive recycling program. Those folks care, both about your data and about our environment.